Healthy eating
Posted in Health

What are we really Eating? (Part 2)

 

The second and final part of our blog series talking about potential hazards in consuming different food preservatives and additives in the foods that we are eating everyday.

 

1. RED 40

Category: Artificial Food Coloring

Banned in 1990, after 8 years of debate, from use in many foods and cosmetics. This dye continues to be on the market until supplies run out! Its been proven to cause thyroid cancer and chromosomal damage in laboratory animals.In addition, it may interfere with brain-nerve transmission.

Commonly Used In

Maraschino cherries, ice cream, candy, bakery products and more! Cereal, Lemonade, Cocktail mix, Snack foods, Salad dressing, Candy, Fruit juice, Fruit Yogurt, Soda.

Potential Health Risks

Learning disabilities and lowered IQ, Antisocial behavior, Depression, Anxiety and Neurotoxicity

Alternate names on Food labels

Allura Red AC, FD&C 

 

2. Xanthan Gum

Category: Food Additive

Xanthan gum is a popular food additive that’s commonly added to our foods as a thickener or stabilizer. It’s created when sugar is fermented by a type of bacteria called Xanthomonas campestris. When sugar is fermented, it creates a broth or goo-like substance. After that, alcohols added to it. It is then dried and turned into a powder.

Commonly Used In

Salad dressings, Bakery products, Fruit juices, Soups, Ice creams, Sauces and gravies, Syrups, Gluten-free products, Low-fat foods

Potential Health Risks

Xanthan gum can cause migraines or skin irritation. Its side effects also include intestinal gas, flatulence, diarrhea and bloating. Increased exposure can make the symptoms worse. A 1990 report in the “Journal of Occupational Medicine” notes that people exposed to large amounts of xanthan gum powder, such as bakery workers, can experience flulike symptoms that include nose and throat irritation.

Alternate names on Food labels

Bacterial Polysaccharide, Corn Sugar Gum, Polysaccharide Xanthane, Xanthan.

 

3. Guar Gum

Category: Food Additive

Guar gum comes from the seeds of the guar or cluster bean plant. About 20 percent to 40 percent of the guar seed consists of galactomannan gum, which forms a thick gel when mixed with water. Its gumlike quality thickens foods, improves texture and stabilizes ingredients. Guar gum is also added to foods to boost fiber content.

Commonly Used In

You’ll find guar gum listed in the ingredients of many different products, such as baked goods, dairy products, frozen desserts, puddings, jams, sauces and gelatin mixes.

Potential Health Risks

Gas production, diarrhea, and loose stools. These side effects usually decrease or disappear after several days of use. High doses of guar gum or not drinking enough fluid with the dose of guar gum can cause blockage of the esophagus and the intestines.

Alternate names on Food labels

Psoraleatatragonoloba, Jaguar Gum, Guar Flour,  Cyamopsistetragonolobus.

 

4. Trans Fats

Category: Food Preservative & Taste Enhancer

Artificial trans fats (or trans fatty acids) are created in an industrial process that adds hydrogen to liquid vegetable oils to make them more solid. Trans fats are easy to use, inexpensive to produce and last a long time. This Preservative gives foods a desirable taste and texture. Many restaurants and fast-food outlets use trans fats to deep-fry foods because oils with trans fats can be used many times in commercial fryers.

Commonly Used In

Trans fats are found in many foods – including fried foods like doughnuts, and baked goods including cakes, pie crusts, biscuits, frozen pizza, cookies, crackers, and stick margarines and other spreads. You can determine the amount of trans fats in a particular packaged food by looking at the Nutrition Facts panel. However, products can be listed as “0 grams of trans fats” if they contain 0 grams to less than 0.5 grams of trans fat per serving.

Potential Health Risks

Increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. It raises your bad (LDL) cholesterol levels and lowers your good (HDL) cholesterol levels.

Alternate names on Food labels

We’re eating Partially hydrogenated cottonseed oil, partially hydrogenated palm oil, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, trans fats, trans fatty acids, partially hydrogenated canola oil in our everyday foods. 

 

As we are busier and our lives more stressful, it’s not always possible for us to eat or procure the cleanest ingredients or food items available. A balance can still be struck if we know of the real dangers present out there on our shopping aisles in the foods that we keep eating. There are brands today that look at protecting not just their consumers, but also the environment. Can’t we just spend a few extra minutes a day researching and getting to know about these? After all, what are a few minutes compared to a lifetime of good Health & Ultra Clean Nutrition.

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